Posted in Design Articles, Featured

Like this post? Share It :
  • Print
  • email
  • PDF
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • MySpace
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Tumblr
  • Reddit
  • Technorati
  • Design Float
  • RSS

Design Evolution

Over the course of time, species modify their phenotypes in ways that permit them to succeed in their surroundings. Designers have also evolved and adapted to their environment. Before technology changed the way we think, designers a.k.a artists were people who did portraits, posters and marked history with unique logos.

Pop ArtJumping a few years… designers were introduced to the computer which helped them boost their learning process and achieve better what they envisioned, they came in contact with the first Mac, and they were blown away! The World Wide Web starting controlling their brain and Macromedia (today owned by Adobe) created the killer tools needed and the force was with us all!

There is no doubt that we (designers) evolve to improve, however evolution has its pros and cons and what we saw as a blessing turned into a curse. Since with technology we started learning faster also was our competition which turned our lives into an endless learning battle. Today if you start learning html you will also realise that you also need to master CSS. Same thing applies for software, you just purchased CS4? BAM! you hear that CS5 is coming out. The wide range of DTP (desktop publishing software) that we have to manipulate to keep up with the latest trends is getting overwhelming. Some designers prefer not to go that extra mile to keep them selves fresh. In most cases this is acceptable because either we can’t afford to invest in better software or we don’t have time to learn/waste. Regardless some designers stick to their guns and never take the next step. I know designers that are still using freehand for instance. While I have nothing against the software because it was one of the best vector based applications of all time yet it has been discontinued years ago and designers still keep using it despite this fact. Its like you have been driving the same car for decades and never bothered to change it. Software is not the only thing we have to worry about, design itself is always changing and we are left with no choice than to shift with it. The definition of a designer has become so vast that if someone asks “what do you do for living?” you can’t just reply “I am a designer” you are better off showing your whole résumé for people to understand what you do. For instance if you are looking for a designer position most ads you will bump into require you to have more than just design skills, some of these firms even expect you to know web design/development even if the advert says “Graphic Designer” or “Designer Wanted” today if you’re not a jack of all trades in this business you will are going to be left behind its like a designer’s job is not justified.

Due to this fact the constant question that most rookie designer’s ask me is “what’s best to learn print or web design?” Its a fact that most designer’s choose web rather then print, in my opinion its because its more common to get a web project rather then a print one and its always more convenient at the end. The only cost there is in web design is your hourly rate no materials needed and the only person you need to rely on is yourself (if you are also a programmer) while on print projects you need to cater for a printer and pray that he will deliver in time to meet your deadline.

Some people claim that print design is a dying breed and all designers will eventually move to the web. Why I do believe we will get there one day, I prefer to keep listening to what my clients need rather than some stipulations. Most clients still prefer material stuff rather than virtual advertising. In-fact Ad sales people find it more difficult to sell online space. Lets take the newspaper for example. Its more easy for a sales agent to get a full page ad which costs hundreds for a one time visual rather than an online banner on their website, which at the same price can go for months! Clients like to invest in what they see and when you start speaking about cpc or cpi they will flee away.I f i continue to elaborate on this you will end up scrolling this article for months so I will pause here for now. The only advise i can give you guys & gals is to choose what you love doing best or in most cases what gets your bread on the table. Just remember to choose what keeps your passion running and don’t rush into things, let your projects guide you through and learn whats needed when required and eventually you will evolve into a better designer. Until then stay here and read more of my articles :)

Like this post? Share It :
  • Print
  • email
  • PDF
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • MySpace
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Tumblr
  • Reddit
  • Technorati
  • Design Float
  • RSS

No related posts.

Comments are closed.